Our People

Secretariat

Dr Selina Namchee Lo

Executive Director

Dr Lo has nearly three decades experience in global and international health with qualifications in medicine (University of Melbourne), tropical medicine (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine) and a Masters in Public and International Law (University of Melbourne).

She is currently also Consulting Editor (Global and Planetary Health Commissions) for The Lancet medical journal where she was previous Senior Editor based in London and Beijing. She has been handling editor of a number of global health peer reviewed commissions including the Rockefeller Lancet Planetary Health report, the first Lancet series on Transgender Health and Global Health 2035: Investing in Health.

Selina has worked in Afghanistan, Myanmar, China, Thailand, and Bangladesh specifically with refugee, stateless, ethnic minority, and IDU and sex worker communities. She was a Medical Director for Essential Medicines for Médecins sans Frontières based in Geneva. She has worked for Save the Children UK and was Clinical Advisor for the seminal Clinton Foundation national HIV AIDS treatment partnership based in China CDC, and inaugural CEO for Doctors for the Environment Australia (DEA). As a consultant Selina has worked with WHO HQ on Common Goods for Health, Victorian Department of Health COVID19 response, and was a visiting fellow to the UN International Institute of Global Health Malaysia on Gender and Health.

Selina sits on the steering committee of SESH global which builds crowd funding capacity for lower and middle income country researchers in infectious diseases and comes to the Alliance from the Monash Sustainable Development Institute (MSDI). She retains an active interest in the arts and local community – supporting Correspondences and by writing the occasional art review.

Abbie Minter

Deputy Director

Abbie joined the Global Health Alliance Australia in June 2020 as Deputy Director. She is also leads on Pacific Friends of Global Health, a key advocacy partnership, hosted by the Alliance, with two of the world’s most significant global health organisations: The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria; and Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.

Abbie has extensive experience across the non-profit, private and public sectors in global health, project management, international development, fundraising and marketing and communications. She has a Master of Public Health and a Bachelor of International Studies, and was previously the National Manager of Ethiopiaid, a non-profit working alongside local Ethiopian partners to bring trusted healthcare and education to some of the most vulnerable and marginalised people in Ethiopia.

Abbie is passionate about improving health equity and mitigating the impacts of climate change on health, and has experience working in Ethiopia, Thailand and London.

Georgina Wawryk

Digital Projects Officer

Georgina is dedicated to contributing to meaningful current global health discourse, including health equity, inclusion, sustainability, and people centredness.

She has experience in public sectors communications and was the Communications Manager at the Iraqi Children’s foundation, an organisation that aims to provide vulnerable children in Iraq with assistance and resources. After spending three months working at Nea Kavala Refugee camp in Greece, Georgina has a particular interest in improving access to healthcare in refugee camps.

Georgina has a Bachelor of Public Relations and is currently in her final year of a Masters of Global Studies.

Prabhleen Kaur

Project Assistant

Prabhleen is passionate about challenging existing structural inequalities. She is bringing her intercultural and program management skills to the Australian Global Health Alliance team.

Prabhleen works on strategic focuses of the alliance with a particular focus on climate change and health, gender and health and decolonisation of global health.

Prabhleen is currently studying a double degree of Bachelor of Global Studies and Bachelor of Science, specialising in International relations.

Cindy Milford

Network Coordinator, Australian Network of WHO Collaborating Centres

Cindy has more than a decade of international experience in program coordination and project management. She has lived and worked in Cambodia, China, Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea, and Tanzania. Having worked for UN organisations, non-government organisations, private sector, and Monash University, Cindy brings an extensive range of knowledge and skill set.

In Papua New Guinea, Cindy worked as the International Program Coordinator for the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA). She coordinated various complex programs funded by multiple donors and led advocacy efforts to improve the health of local communities. Cindy also worked with UNICEF in China and FHI360 in Cambodia, in the areas of HIV prevention among at-risk populations.

Cindy has a Master of Public Health degree majoring in International Health, and a Postgraduate Diploma in Development Studies. She is passionate about global health issues, especially those that affect vulnerable women and girls.

Dr Selina Namchee Lo

Executive Director

Dr Lo has nearly three decades experience in global and international health with qualifications in medicine (University of Melbourne), tropical medicine (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine) and a Masters in Public and International Law (University of Melbourne).

She is currently also Consulting Editor (Global and Planetary Health Commissions) for The Lancet medical journal where she was previous Senior Editor based in London and Beijing. She has been handling editor of a number of global health peer reviewed commissions including the Rockefeller Lancet Planetary Health report, the first Lancet series on Transgender Health and Global Health 2035: Investing in Health.

Selina has worked in Afghanistan, Myanmar, China, Thailand, and Bangladesh specifically with refugee, stateless, ethnic minority, and IDU and sex worker communities. She was a Medical Director for Essential Medicines for Médecins sans Frontières based in Geneva. She has worked for Save the Children UK and was Clinical Advisor for the seminal Clinton Foundation national HIV AIDS treatment partnership based in China CDC, and inaugural CEO for Doctors for the Environment Australia (DEA). As a consultant Selina has worked with WHO HQ on Common Goods for Health, Victorian Department of Health COVID19 response, and was a visiting fellow to the UN International Institute of Global Health Malaysia on Gender and Health.

Selina sits on the steering committee of SESH global which builds crowd funding capacity for lower and middle income country researchers in infectious diseases and comes to the Alliance from the Monash Sustainable Development Institute (MSDI). She retains an active interest in the arts and local community – supporting Correspondences and by writing the occasional art review.

Abbie Minter

Deputy Director

Abbie joined the Global Health Alliance Australia in June 2020 as Deputy Director. She is also leads on Pacific Friends of Global Health, a key advocacy partnership, hosted by the Alliance, with two of the world’s most significant global health organisations: The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria; and Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.

Abbie has extensive experience across the non-profit, private and public sectors in global health, project management, international development, fundraising and marketing and communications. She has a Master of Public Health and a Bachelor of International Studies, and was previously the National Manager of Ethiopiaid, a non-profit working alongside local Ethiopian partners to bring trusted healthcare and education to some of the most vulnerable and marginalised people in Ethiopia.

Abbie is passionate about improving health equity and mitigating the impacts of climate change on health, and has experience working in Ethiopia, Thailand and London.

Georgina Wawryk

Digital Projects Officer

Georgina is dedicated to contributing to meaningful current global health discourse, including health equity, inclusion, sustainability, and people centredness.

She has experience in public sectors communications and was the Communications Manager at the Iraqi Children’s foundation, an organisation that aims to provide vulnerable children in Iraq with assistance and resources. After spending three months working at Nea Kavala Refugee camp in Greece, Georgina has a particular interest in improving access to healthcare in refugee camps.

Georgina has a Bachelor of Public Relations and is currently in her final year of a Masters of Global Studies.

Prabhleen Kaur

Project Assistant

Prabhleen is passionate about challenging existing structural inequalities. She is bringing her intercultural and program management skills to the Australian Global Health Alliance team.

Prabhleen works on strategic focuses of the alliance with a particular focus on climate change and health, gender and health and decolonisation of global health.

Prabhleen is currently studying a double degree of Bachelor of Global Studies and Bachelor of Science, specialising in International relations.

Cindy Milford

Network Coordinator, Australian Network of WHO Collaborating Centres

Cindy has more than a decade of international experience in program coordination and project management. She has lived and worked in Cambodia, China, Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea, and Tanzania. Having worked for UN organisations, non-government organisations, private sector, and Monash University, Cindy brings an extensive range of knowledge and skill set.

In Papua New Guinea, Cindy worked as the International Program Coordinator for the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA). She coordinated various complex programs funded by multiple donors and led advocacy efforts to improve the health of local communities. Cindy also worked with UNICEF in China and FHI360 in Cambodia, in the areas of HIV prevention among at-risk populations.

Cindy has a Master of Public Health degree majoring in International Health, and a Postgraduate Diploma in Development Studies. She is passionate about global health issues, especially those that affect vulnerable women and girls.

Advisory Board

Professor Brendan Crabb AC

Director and CEO, Burnet Institute Chair & Executive Committee Member

Professor Brendan Crabb AC PhD FAA FAHMS FASM is an infectious disease researcher with a special interest in malaria. His research group develops and exploits genetic approaches to better understand malaria parasite biology, principally to help prioritise vaccine and drug targets.

Although a molecular scientist by training, Professor Crabb’s interests include addressing technical and non-technical barriers to maternal, newborn and child health in the developing world. In recent years, under the banner of Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies, he helped establish a major research field site in East New Britain in Papua New Guinea, principally to identify the underlying drivers (including malaria) of low birth weight and stunting in relatively calorie-rich, yet resource-poor settings.

Since 2008 he has been the Director and CEO of the Macfarlane Burnet Institute for Medical Research and Public Health (Burnet Institute), a research institute that has a focus on infectious diseases and maternal and child health, especially for populations most in need. Burnet has played a major role in the COVID-19 pandemic, including advising governments and advocating strongly for public health action.

Professor Crabb is President of both the Australian Global Health Alliance and the Pacific Friends of Global Health, bodies that advocate for better health equity. He is the past-President of the Association of Australian Medical Research Institutes (AAMRI), the peak body for independent medical research Institutes in Australia. Professor Crabb has played critical roles in transformative government policy and funding initiatives, including in the generation of the $20b Medical Research Future Fund.

He is currently a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science (FAA), a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences (FAHMS) and of the Australian Society for Microbiology (FASM). He served on the governing Council of the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia from 2016 – 2021. Internationally, he currently serves on the International Advisory Boards of the Sanger Institute (UK) and on the WHO Malaria Vaccine Advisory Committee (MALVAC) in Geneva. Professor Crabb was the Co-Founder of the 1st Malaria World Congress and of the Molecular Approaches to Malaria Conferences.

Prior to 2008, Professor Crabb was a Senior Principal Research Fellow in the NHMRC and an International Fellow of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in the US. He is an experienced educator having been a full-time teaching and research academic at the University of Melbourne (1996-2000) and has been immersed in education at secondary and tertiary levels ever since.

In 2015, he was awarded a Companion of the Order of Australia, Australia’s highest civilian honour, in 2019 he received the GSK Award for Research Excellence and in 2020 he was awarded the Global Citizen Prize: Australia’s Hero Award.

Professor Jane Fisher AO

Finkel Professor of Global Health and Director at Global and Women’s Health Unit, Monash University Deputy Chair & Executive Committee Member

Jane Fisher, Director of the Global and Women’s Health Unit, is an academic Clinical and Health Psychologist with longstanding interests in the social determinants of health. Her research focuses on gender-based risks to women’s mental health and psychological functioning from adolescence to mid-life, in particular related to fertility, conception, pregnancy, the perinatal period and chronic non-communicable diseases; and on parenting capabilities and early childhood development in low- and high-income settings. She has completed major epidemiological studies in clinical and community settings in Australia and Vietnam, nationally funded intervention trials, and has supervised more than 30 research higher degree and postgraduate coursework projects to completion. She is an expert technical advisor to international agencies including the World Health Organization, UNICEF and the United Nations Population Fund.

A/Professor Helen Evans AO

Honorary Professor, Nossal Institute for Global Health Executive Committee Member

Helen Evans AO served as Deputy CEO at Gavi, The Vaccine Alliance based in Geneva from 2009 until her retirement in 2014.

Prior to joining Gavi, she served as Deputy Executive Director at the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, also based in Geneva, between 2005 and 2009.

She has a depth of experience in national and global health policy and strategy development, infectious diseases and working in public private partnerships to deliver results. In the early 1990s Helen managed the National Communicable Diseases Program in the Australian Department of Health. For the seven years prior to moving to Geneva she headed up the Australian Government Office for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health.

Now living in Melbourne she currently has an honorary appointment as Associate Professor at the Nossal Institute for Global Health at the University of Melbourne, is a board member of The Fred Hollows Foundation, the Burnet Institute, and the Australian Global Health Alliance and is a member of the Independant Advisory Panel (IEP) of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.

Matt Ralston

Chief Operating Officer, Nossal Institute for Global Health Executive Committee Member

Matt joined the Nossal Institute in 2016 and loves making the Nossal’s work happen and seeing the impact it has! He is an established, reliable, resourceful, collaborative and high performing executive with proven leadership experience in commercial, NGO and University sectors in Asia Pacific and Europe.

Matt has an undergraduate Arts degree with a focus on SE Asian politics and development, Indonesian and English literature. He has a Master of Marketing, a Graduate Certificate in Management and speaks Bahasa Indonesia.

Matt has a strong track record leading and managing large-scale, multi-disciplinary programs and operations targeted to the poor and disadvantaged with Health being a focus since 2011. He has a depth of experience building effective relationships with complex clients and stakeholders, including government and major donors coupled with business development and strategic marketing expertise, including tracking and analysing client and sector trends to inform strategy and management decision-making.

Matt is highly-focused and has a reputation of effective and timely delivery and success driving and implementing organisational change and development initiatives.

Anushka Patel

Chief Executive Officer, The George Institute for Global Health Incoming board member 2024

Anushka Patel is Chief Executive Officer of The George Institute for Global Health and Scientia Professor at UNSW (University of New South Wales) Sydney. She is a cardiologist, with research interests in the prevention and management of common chronic conditions through large-scale clinical trials and implementation science. Anushka undertook her medical training at the University of Queensland, with subsequent postgraduate research degrees from Harvard University and University of Sydney. She is a Fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians, and of the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences.

Brett Sutton

Director, Health and Biosecurity, CSIRO Incoming board member 2024

Brett Andrew Sutton AO (born 1968 or 1969) is an Australian public health doctor who served as the Chief Health Officer of Victoria between March 2019 and July 2023. Sutton served in this role during the COVID-19 pandemic and became a public face of the response to the pandemic in Victoria.

In addition to his role as Chief Health Officer of Victoria, Sutton is currently Chief Human Biosecurity Officer for Victoria, a Fellow of the Royal Society for Public Health, a Fellow of the Australasian College of Tropical Medicine, a Fellow of the Australasian Faculty of Public Health Medicine (AFPHM) and is a member of the Faculty of Travel Medicine.

Professor Colleen Fisher

Professor and Head of School, School of Population and Global Health, University of Western Australia

Colleen Fisher is Professor and Head of School, School of Population and Global Health. Her research expertise is in the area of family and domestic violence, an area she has been researching for over 20 years. Her research has examined experiences of family and domestic violence, its health and social impact, and has been across the lifespan and across cultures. She was the first to undertake comprehensive research into the experience, understanding and impact of family and domestic violence on refugees and refugee communities, post settlement in Australia, and her research has informed policy and program development. Additionally Colleen has undertaken a range of national and state family and domestic violence program evaluations in both the health and human services sectors. Colleen has been an invited member of a number of government advisory boards related to family and domestic violence and was a WA Department of Health Clinical Senate expert witness.

Adj. Associate Professor Darryl O’Donnell

Director and Principal, Praxis Insights

Darryl O’Donnell is a public health professional with 30 years’ experience working in community, research, public and private sector roles. Darryl is the Director and Principal of Praxis Insights, a management consulting company. He was the CEO of Health Equity Matters, formerly the Australian Federation of AIDS Organisations, for the period from 2016 to 2023. Prior to that, he was a senior public servant. He has held governance roles in community organisations including, currently, as a Board member of the Consumers Health Forum of Australia and Advisory Board member of the Australian Global Health Alliance and Pacific Friends of Global Health. He is a member of the National Health and Medical Research Council’s Consumer and Community Advisory Group. Darryl holds Masters degrees in Research and Public Policy and is an Adjunct Professor at the University of NSW.

Professor Ian Anderson AO

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) at the University of Tasmania.

Professor Ian Anderson is the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) at the University of Tasmania. As an academic and public servant he has made significant contributions to Indigenous health and education. His extensive background in research, including public health and the social and cultural determinants of health, has enabled him to provide invaluable insights into program and policy development in these fields.

A palawa man, Professor Anderson was born in Devonport and is deeply connected to his traditional culture and community through his ties to Tebrakunna country in northeast Tasmania. He has an unwavering dedication to preserving and honouring his heritage. His non-Aboriginal family are largely of convict descent from across lutruwita/Tasmania.

Professor Anderson graduated from the University of Melbourne as a medical doctor in 1989 and was later awarded an honorary Doctor of Medicine. He was also awarded his PhD in Sociology and Anthropology in 2006. He is currently a public health physician and member of the Faculty of Public Health Medicine in the Royal Australian College of Physicians.

Professor Anderson has been a national policy leader in Indigenous affairs, and higher education policy and programs. During his more than 20 years of working in higher education, he has promoted access to higher education for Indigenous Australians and for Australians from regional areas and educationally disadvantaged communities.

Through his exceptional leadership skills, extensive research contributions, and dedication, Professor Anderson has made significant contributions to Indigenous education and health in Australia.

Professor Anderson was awarded the Order of Australia in 2017 and in 2018 he was elected a member of the Academy of Social Sciences Australian and the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences.

As a highly respected figure, Professor Anderson has inspired countless individuals and left an indelible mark on Indigenous education and health. He hopes his legacy will continue to inspire future generations of Indigenous leaders and scholars, to follow in his footsteps and continue the critical work of advancing Indigenous education and health in Australia.

Leanne Joyce

External Affairs Adviser with Medicines, Malaria Venture (MMV)

Leanne Joyce has extensive experience as an advocate and public policy professional. She has been External Affairs Adviser with Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV) for five years and has advocated for global health, product development partnerships and the need to continue efforts to eradicate neglected diseases such as malaria.
In the early 1990’s Leanne was Executive Director of the Australian Federation of AIDS Organisations when AFAO advocated for better access to treatments, prevention and research, and played a greater part in regional and global networks. After a series of leadership roles in Government and the corporate sector, Leanne joined the Asia Pacific Business Coalition on AIDS (APBCA) that worked with business coalitions in 13 countries to limit the impact of HIV/AIDS and TB.

Marion Stanton

Head of Government Relations at Save the Children Australia

Marion Stanton has been the Head of Government Relations at Save the Children since March 2015, where she draws on extensive experience in politics and public policy development to advance the organisation’s advocacy priorities. She has worked as an adviser to members of the Federal Parliament, focussing on education and social policy. From 1993 to 1998, Marion was on the staff of then Victorian Premier, Jeff Kennett, including as principal policy adviser. During this time, she worked closely with the Premier’s Drug Advisory Council and Youth Suicide Prevention Committee as well as a range of social policy matters. Marion has also worked as a government relations adviser for a major airline, as a senior adviser to the Vice-Chancellor of the University of New England, and as the Head of Bruce Hall at Australian National University. Marion began her career at the Federal Department of Transport in Canberra after graduating with a BA (Honours) from the Australian National University. Together with former Federal Minister, Rod Kemp, she published Speaking for Australia: Parliamentary speeches that shaped the nation (Allen & Unwin, 2004).

Professor Nancy Baxter

Head, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne

Nancy is a clinical epidemiologist, colorectal surgeon and health services researcher. Before joining the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, she was the Associate Dean, Academic Affairs at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, a Professor of Surgery in the Department of Surgery and the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto. Her main research interests are in the evaluation of patterns of cancer care, the evaluation of cancer screening, determining the long-term consequences of cancer care for survivors and improving the quality and safety of surgery. She has published over 250 peer-reviewed articles. She also applies the use of linked health administrative data and cancer registry data to evaluate long-term consequences of cancer care for adults. She is a Fellow of both the American College of Surgeons and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.

Professor Barbara McPake

Health Economist

Former Director, Nossal Institute for Global Health, University of Melbourne and one of two Research Directors of ‘ReBUILD’ a UK Department for International Development funded Research Programme Consortium on health systems development.. Formerly, Director, Institute for International Health and Development, Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh (2005-2014) Programme Director, Health Systems Development Knowledge Programme (also funded by DFID) (2001-6) and Head of Health Policy Unit (2001-4) at London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Extensive research degree supervision and other postgraduate teaching experience. Extensive international experience in health systems research and policy analysis and advice to UN agencies and low and middle income country governments.

Professor Rachel Huxley

Executive Dean, Faculty of Health, Deakin University

Professor Rachel Huxley was appointed to the role of Executive Dean for the Faculty of Health at Deakin University in October 2019. Prior to this, she was the Associate Pro-Vice Chancellor (Research) for the College of Science, Health and Engineering at La Trobe University, Australia where she was also the Co-Director of the Research Centre for Cardiovascular Biology and Disease.
Professor Huxley completed her undergraduate studies at St John’s College, Oxford and obtained her doctorate in epidemiology and public health from the Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Oxford University and completed her post-doctoral training also in Oxford before relocating to the George Institute for Global Health, University of New South Wales in 2002, where she continues to hold an honorary professorial appointment. In 2017 she was made a Visiting Professorial Fellow in Epidemiology within the Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford.
Between 2002 and 2009, she was awarded three internationally competitive fellowships including the inaugural Career Development Fellowship from the Heart Foundation and the NSW Office for Science and Medical Research. In 2009, Professor Huxley relocated to the United States where she became a co-investigator on the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study and the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis in the Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Minnesota. In 2013, Professor Huxley returned to Australia to take her the Chair in Epidemiology at the University of Queensland, before moving into the role of Head of School of Public Health at Curtin University in Perth in 2015. Her research has two main foci; the first is on the determination and quantification of major and modifiable risk factors for chronic disease and sex and ethnic disparities in these relationships; and the second area is in evaluating the health impact of climate change and air pollution. She has published more than 200 research articles, has a H-index of 58 (Web of Science) and currently holds several competitive NHMRC research grants as Principal or Co-Investigator in areas related to obesity, diabetes and women’s health.

Robin Davies

Honorary Professor, Development Policy Centre Incoming board member 2024

Robin Davies, Honorary Professor at the Australian National University since April 2023, led the Global Health Division and Indo-Pacific Centre for Health Security at Australia’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade for over five years. Prior, he was Associate Director at the Development Policy Centre from 2012 to 2017. With nearly two decades at the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID), including senior roles and representation on the G20 Development Working Group, he shaped significant global initiatives like the Seoul Development Consensus. Robin spearheaded Australia’s aid efforts in Indonesia, oversaw climate change funding initiatives, and represented Australia on international boards. He holds an honors degree in philosophy from ANU and serves on various global health and development boards.

 

Dr Sandro Demaio

Chief Executive Officer at VicHealth Incoming board member 2024

Dr Sandro Demaio is the CEO of VicHealth, a medical doctor and a public health expert and advocate. He previously held the roles of Medical Officer for non-communicable conditions and nutrition at the World Health Organization, and CEO of the EAT Foundation; the science-based, global platform for food systems transformation where he oversaw the global launch of the EAT-Lancet Commission. Sandro is a member of the Nutrition Strategy Advisory Board, for Pictet Group in Switzerland.

In his pro bono work, Dr Demaio co-founded NCDFREE, a global social movement against chronic disease which reached more than 2.5 million young people in its first 18 months. In 2015, he founded festival21, assembling and leading a team of experts in staging an unprecedented free celebration of community, food, culture and the SDGs in his hometown of Melbourne. Then in 2018, he established an independent, not-for-profit foundation focused on improving the health and nutrition of young Australians.

He has published more than forty scientific papers, including publications in The Lancet and The BMJ. He also authored the Doctor’s Diet, a cookbook based on science and inspired by a love of good food.

From 2017 to 2019, Sandro co-hosted the ABC and Netflix television show Ask the Doctor – an innovative and exploratory factual medical series broadcasting across Australia and around the world.

Dr Demaio originally trained and worked as a medical doctor at The Alfred Hospital in Melbourne. He holds a Masters degree in public health, a PhD in non-communicable diseases and has held fellowships at Harvard Medical School, Copenhagen School of Global Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the University of Melbourne.

Associate Professor Seye Abimbola

Associate Professor of Health Systems at the University of Sydney Incoming board member 2024

Seye Abimbola is a health systems researcher from Nigeria. He is currently based at the University of Sydney in Australia, where his teaching and research focus on knowledge practices in global health, health system governance, and the adoption and scale up of health system innovations. Dr Abimbola was awarded the 2020-2022 Prince Claus Chair in Equity and Development at Utrecht University in the Netherlands for his work on justice in global health research. He is the editor in chief of BMJ Global Health.

Professor Tony Capon

Director, Monash Sustainable Development Institute, Monash University

Tony Capon directs the Monash Sustainable Development Institute (MSDI) and holds a chair in planetary health in the School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine at the University. A former director of the global health institute at United Nations University (UNU-IIGH), he is a public health physician and authority in environmental health and health promotion. His research focuses on urbanisation, sustainable development and population health. Tony has 30 years of leadership and management experience in research, education, policy and practice.
Previously, Tony held professorial appointments with the University of Sydney and Australian National University. He was the founding convenor of the climate change adaptation research network for human health in Australia. The inaugural director of public health and medical officer of health in western Sydney, Tony also worked on the control of non-communicable diseases with the charitable organisation Oxford Health Alliance. Since 2008, Tony has been advising the International Council for Science on the development of a global interdisciplinary science program on health and wellbeing in the changing urban environment using systems approaches.
He has held National Health and Medical Research Council and World Health Organization Fellowships, and has served in numerous honorary leadership roles with professional societies and not-for-profit organisations including the Australasian Faculty of Public Health Medicine in the Royal Australasian College of Physicians, the International Society for Urban Health and the Frank Fenner Foundation (previously called Nature and Society Forum).

Professor Brendan Crabb AC

Director and CEO, Burnet Institute Chair & Executive Committee Member

Professor Brendan Crabb AC PhD FAA FAHMS FASM is an infectious disease researcher with a special interest in malaria. His research group develops and exploits genetic approaches to better understand malaria parasite biology, principally to help prioritise vaccine and drug targets.

Although a molecular scientist by training, Professor Crabb’s interests include addressing technical and non-technical barriers to maternal, newborn and child health in the developing world. In recent years, under the banner of Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies, he helped establish a major research field site in East New Britain in Papua New Guinea, principally to identify the underlying drivers (including malaria) of low birth weight and stunting in relatively calorie-rich, yet resource-poor settings.

Since 2008 he has been the Director and CEO of the Macfarlane Burnet Institute for Medical Research and Public Health (Burnet Institute), a research institute that has a focus on infectious diseases and maternal and child health, especially for populations most in need. Burnet has played a major role in the COVID-19 pandemic, including advising governments and advocating strongly for public health action.

Professor Crabb is President of both the Australian Global Health Alliance and the Pacific Friends of Global Health, bodies that advocate for better health equity. He is the past-President of the Association of Australian Medical Research Institutes (AAMRI), the peak body for independent medical research Institutes in Australia. Professor Crabb has played critical roles in transformative government policy and funding initiatives, including in the generation of the $20b Medical Research Future Fund.

He is currently a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science (FAA), a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences (FAHMS) and of the Australian Society for Microbiology (FASM). He served on the governing Council of the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia from 2016 – 2021. Internationally, he currently serves on the International Advisory Boards of the Sanger Institute (UK) and on the WHO Malaria Vaccine Advisory Committee (MALVAC) in Geneva. Professor Crabb was the Co-Founder of the 1st Malaria World Congress and of the Molecular Approaches to Malaria Conferences.

Prior to 2008, Professor Crabb was a Senior Principal Research Fellow in the NHMRC and an International Fellow of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in the US. He is an experienced educator having been a full-time teaching and research academic at the University of Melbourne (1996-2000) and has been immersed in education at secondary and tertiary levels ever since.

In 2015, he was awarded a Companion of the Order of Australia, Australia’s highest civilian honour, in 2019 he received the GSK Award for Research Excellence and in 2020 he was awarded the Global Citizen Prize: Australia’s Hero Award.

Professor Jane Fisher AO

Finkel Professor of Global Health and Director at Global and Women’s Health Unit, Monash University Deputy Chair & Executive Committee Member

Jane Fisher, Director of the Global and Women’s Health Unit, is an academic Clinical and Health Psychologist with longstanding interests in the social determinants of health. Her research focuses on gender-based risks to women’s mental health and psychological functioning from adolescence to mid-life, in particular related to fertility, conception, pregnancy, the perinatal period and chronic non-communicable diseases; and on parenting capabilities and early childhood development in low- and high-income settings. She has completed major epidemiological studies in clinical and community settings in Australia and Vietnam, nationally funded intervention trials, and has supervised more than 30 research higher degree and postgraduate coursework projects to completion. She is an expert technical advisor to international agencies including the World Health Organization, UNICEF and the United Nations Population Fund.

A/Professor Helen Evans AO

Honorary Professor, Nossal Institute for Global Health Executive Committee Member

Helen Evans AO served as Deputy CEO at Gavi, The Vaccine Alliance based in Geneva from 2009 until her retirement in 2014.

Prior to joining Gavi, she served as Deputy Executive Director at the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, also based in Geneva, between 2005 and 2009.

She has a depth of experience in national and global health policy and strategy development, infectious diseases and working in public private partnerships to deliver results. In the early 1990s Helen managed the National Communicable Diseases Program in the Australian Department of Health. For the seven years prior to moving to Geneva she headed up the Australian Government Office for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health.

Now living in Melbourne she currently has an honorary appointment as Associate Professor at the Nossal Institute for Global Health at the University of Melbourne, is a board member of The Fred Hollows Foundation, the Burnet Institute, and the Australian Global Health Alliance and is a member of the Independant Advisory Panel (IEP) of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.

Matt Ralston

Chief Operating Officer, Nossal Institute for Global Health Executive Committee Member

Matt joined the Nossal Institute in 2016 and loves making the Nossal’s work happen and seeing the impact it has! He is an established, reliable, resourceful, collaborative and high performing executive with proven leadership experience in commercial, NGO and University sectors in Asia Pacific and Europe.

Matt has an undergraduate Arts degree with a focus on SE Asian politics and development, Indonesian and English literature. He has a Master of Marketing, a Graduate Certificate in Management and speaks Bahasa Indonesia.

Matt has a strong track record leading and managing large-scale, multi-disciplinary programs and operations targeted to the poor and disadvantaged with Health being a focus since 2011. He has a depth of experience building effective relationships with complex clients and stakeholders, including government and major donors coupled with business development and strategic marketing expertise, including tracking and analysing client and sector trends to inform strategy and management decision-making.

Matt is highly-focused and has a reputation of effective and timely delivery and success driving and implementing organisational change and development initiatives.

Anushka Patel

Chief Executive Officer, The George Institute for Global Health Incoming board member 2024

Anushka Patel is Chief Executive Officer of The George Institute for Global Health and Scientia Professor at UNSW (University of New South Wales) Sydney. She is a cardiologist, with research interests in the prevention and management of common chronic conditions through large-scale clinical trials and implementation science. Anushka undertook her medical training at the University of Queensland, with subsequent postgraduate research degrees from Harvard University and University of Sydney. She is a Fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians, and of the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences.

Brett Sutton

Director, Health and Biosecurity, CSIRO Incoming board member 2024

Brett Andrew Sutton AO (born 1968 or 1969) is an Australian public health doctor who served as the Chief Health Officer of Victoria between March 2019 and July 2023. Sutton served in this role during the COVID-19 pandemic and became a public face of the response to the pandemic in Victoria.

In addition to his role as Chief Health Officer of Victoria, Sutton is currently Chief Human Biosecurity Officer for Victoria, a Fellow of the Royal Society for Public Health, a Fellow of the Australasian College of Tropical Medicine, a Fellow of the Australasian Faculty of Public Health Medicine (AFPHM) and is a member of the Faculty of Travel Medicine.

Professor Colleen Fisher

Professor and Head of School, School of Population and Global Health, University of Western Australia

Colleen Fisher is Professor and Head of School, School of Population and Global Health. Her research expertise is in the area of family and domestic violence, an area she has been researching for over 20 years. Her research has examined experiences of family and domestic violence, its health and social impact, and has been across the lifespan and across cultures. She was the first to undertake comprehensive research into the experience, understanding and impact of family and domestic violence on refugees and refugee communities, post settlement in Australia, and her research has informed policy and program development. Additionally Colleen has undertaken a range of national and state family and domestic violence program evaluations in both the health and human services sectors. Colleen has been an invited member of a number of government advisory boards related to family and domestic violence and was a WA Department of Health Clinical Senate expert witness.

Adj. Associate Professor Darryl O’Donnell

Director and Principal, Praxis Insights

Darryl O’Donnell is a public health professional with 30 years’ experience working in community, research, public and private sector roles. Darryl is the Director and Principal of Praxis Insights, a management consulting company. He was the CEO of Health Equity Matters, formerly the Australian Federation of AIDS Organisations, for the period from 2016 to 2023. Prior to that, he was a senior public servant. He has held governance roles in community organisations including, currently, as a Board member of the Consumers Health Forum of Australia and Advisory Board member of the Australian Global Health Alliance and Pacific Friends of Global Health. He is a member of the National Health and Medical Research Council’s Consumer and Community Advisory Group. Darryl holds Masters degrees in Research and Public Policy and is an Adjunct Professor at the University of NSW.

Professor Ian Anderson AO

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) at the University of Tasmania.

Professor Ian Anderson is the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) at the University of Tasmania. As an academic and public servant he has made significant contributions to Indigenous health and education. His extensive background in research, including public health and the social and cultural determinants of health, has enabled him to provide invaluable insights into program and policy development in these fields.

A palawa man, Professor Anderson was born in Devonport and is deeply connected to his traditional culture and community through his ties to Tebrakunna country in northeast Tasmania. He has an unwavering dedication to preserving and honouring his heritage. His non-Aboriginal family are largely of convict descent from across lutruwita/Tasmania.

Professor Anderson graduated from the University of Melbourne as a medical doctor in 1989 and was later awarded an honorary Doctor of Medicine. He was also awarded his PhD in Sociology and Anthropology in 2006. He is currently a public health physician and member of the Faculty of Public Health Medicine in the Royal Australian College of Physicians.

Professor Anderson has been a national policy leader in Indigenous affairs, and higher education policy and programs. During his more than 20 years of working in higher education, he has promoted access to higher education for Indigenous Australians and for Australians from regional areas and educationally disadvantaged communities.

Through his exceptional leadership skills, extensive research contributions, and dedication, Professor Anderson has made significant contributions to Indigenous education and health in Australia.

Professor Anderson was awarded the Order of Australia in 2017 and in 2018 he was elected a member of the Academy of Social Sciences Australian and the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences.

As a highly respected figure, Professor Anderson has inspired countless individuals and left an indelible mark on Indigenous education and health. He hopes his legacy will continue to inspire future generations of Indigenous leaders and scholars, to follow in his footsteps and continue the critical work of advancing Indigenous education and health in Australia.

Leanne Joyce

External Affairs Adviser with Medicines, Malaria Venture (MMV)

Leanne Joyce has extensive experience as an advocate and public policy professional. She has been External Affairs Adviser with Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV) for five years and has advocated for global health, product development partnerships and the need to continue efforts to eradicate neglected diseases such as malaria.
In the early 1990’s Leanne was Executive Director of the Australian Federation of AIDS Organisations when AFAO advocated for better access to treatments, prevention and research, and played a greater part in regional and global networks. After a series of leadership roles in Government and the corporate sector, Leanne joined the Asia Pacific Business Coalition on AIDS (APBCA) that worked with business coalitions in 13 countries to limit the impact of HIV/AIDS and TB.

Marion Stanton

Head of Government Relations at Save the Children Australia

Marion Stanton has been the Head of Government Relations at Save the Children since March 2015, where she draws on extensive experience in politics and public policy development to advance the organisation’s advocacy priorities. She has worked as an adviser to members of the Federal Parliament, focussing on education and social policy. From 1993 to 1998, Marion was on the staff of then Victorian Premier, Jeff Kennett, including as principal policy adviser. During this time, she worked closely with the Premier’s Drug Advisory Council and Youth Suicide Prevention Committee as well as a range of social policy matters. Marion has also worked as a government relations adviser for a major airline, as a senior adviser to the Vice-Chancellor of the University of New England, and as the Head of Bruce Hall at Australian National University. Marion began her career at the Federal Department of Transport in Canberra after graduating with a BA (Honours) from the Australian National University. Together with former Federal Minister, Rod Kemp, she published Speaking for Australia: Parliamentary speeches that shaped the nation (Allen & Unwin, 2004).

Professor Nancy Baxter

Head, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne

Nancy is a clinical epidemiologist, colorectal surgeon and health services researcher. Before joining the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, she was the Associate Dean, Academic Affairs at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, a Professor of Surgery in the Department of Surgery and the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto. Her main research interests are in the evaluation of patterns of cancer care, the evaluation of cancer screening, determining the long-term consequences of cancer care for survivors and improving the quality and safety of surgery. She has published over 250 peer-reviewed articles. She also applies the use of linked health administrative data and cancer registry data to evaluate long-term consequences of cancer care for adults. She is a Fellow of both the American College of Surgeons and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.

Professor Barbara McPake

Health Economist

Former Director, Nossal Institute for Global Health, University of Melbourne and one of two Research Directors of ‘ReBUILD’ a UK Department for International Development funded Research Programme Consortium on health systems development.. Formerly, Director, Institute for International Health and Development, Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh (2005-2014) Programme Director, Health Systems Development Knowledge Programme (also funded by DFID) (2001-6) and Head of Health Policy Unit (2001-4) at London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Extensive research degree supervision and other postgraduate teaching experience. Extensive international experience in health systems research and policy analysis and advice to UN agencies and low and middle income country governments.

Professor Rachel Huxley

Executive Dean, Faculty of Health, Deakin University

Professor Rachel Huxley was appointed to the role of Executive Dean for the Faculty of Health at Deakin University in October 2019. Prior to this, she was the Associate Pro-Vice Chancellor (Research) for the College of Science, Health and Engineering at La Trobe University, Australia where she was also the Co-Director of the Research Centre for Cardiovascular Biology and Disease.
Professor Huxley completed her undergraduate studies at St John’s College, Oxford and obtained her doctorate in epidemiology and public health from the Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Oxford University and completed her post-doctoral training also in Oxford before relocating to the George Institute for Global Health, University of New South Wales in 2002, where she continues to hold an honorary professorial appointment. In 2017 she was made a Visiting Professorial Fellow in Epidemiology within the Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford.
Between 2002 and 2009, she was awarded three internationally competitive fellowships including the inaugural Career Development Fellowship from the Heart Foundation and the NSW Office for Science and Medical Research. In 2009, Professor Huxley relocated to the United States where she became a co-investigator on the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study and the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis in the Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Minnesota. In 2013, Professor Huxley returned to Australia to take her the Chair in Epidemiology at the University of Queensland, before moving into the role of Head of School of Public Health at Curtin University in Perth in 2015. Her research has two main foci; the first is on the determination and quantification of major and modifiable risk factors for chronic disease and sex and ethnic disparities in these relationships; and the second area is in evaluating the health impact of climate change and air pollution. She has published more than 200 research articles, has a H-index of 58 (Web of Science) and currently holds several competitive NHMRC research grants as Principal or Co-Investigator in areas related to obesity, diabetes and women’s health.

Robin Davies

Honorary Professor, Development Policy Centre Incoming board member 2024

Robin Davies, Honorary Professor at the Australian National University since April 2023, led the Global Health Division and Indo-Pacific Centre for Health Security at Australia’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade for over five years. Prior, he was Associate Director at the Development Policy Centre from 2012 to 2017. With nearly two decades at the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID), including senior roles and representation on the G20 Development Working Group, he shaped significant global initiatives like the Seoul Development Consensus. Robin spearheaded Australia’s aid efforts in Indonesia, oversaw climate change funding initiatives, and represented Australia on international boards. He holds an honors degree in philosophy from ANU and serves on various global health and development boards.

 

Dr Sandro Demaio

Chief Executive Officer at VicHealth Incoming board member 2024

Dr Sandro Demaio is the CEO of VicHealth, a medical doctor and a public health expert and advocate. He previously held the roles of Medical Officer for non-communicable conditions and nutrition at the World Health Organization, and CEO of the EAT Foundation; the science-based, global platform for food systems transformation where he oversaw the global launch of the EAT-Lancet Commission. Sandro is a member of the Nutrition Strategy Advisory Board, for Pictet Group in Switzerland.

In his pro bono work, Dr Demaio co-founded NCDFREE, a global social movement against chronic disease which reached more than 2.5 million young people in its first 18 months. In 2015, he founded festival21, assembling and leading a team of experts in staging an unprecedented free celebration of community, food, culture and the SDGs in his hometown of Melbourne. Then in 2018, he established an independent, not-for-profit foundation focused on improving the health and nutrition of young Australians.

He has published more than forty scientific papers, including publications in The Lancet and The BMJ. He also authored the Doctor’s Diet, a cookbook based on science and inspired by a love of good food.

From 2017 to 2019, Sandro co-hosted the ABC and Netflix television show Ask the Doctor – an innovative and exploratory factual medical series broadcasting across Australia and around the world.

Dr Demaio originally trained and worked as a medical doctor at The Alfred Hospital in Melbourne. He holds a Masters degree in public health, a PhD in non-communicable diseases and has held fellowships at Harvard Medical School, Copenhagen School of Global Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the University of Melbourne.

Associate Professor Seye Abimbola

Associate Professor of Health Systems at the University of Sydney Incoming board member 2024

Seye Abimbola is a health systems researcher from Nigeria. He is currently based at the University of Sydney in Australia, where his teaching and research focus on knowledge practices in global health, health system governance, and the adoption and scale up of health system innovations. Dr Abimbola was awarded the 2020-2022 Prince Claus Chair in Equity and Development at Utrecht University in the Netherlands for his work on justice in global health research. He is the editor in chief of BMJ Global Health.

Professor Tony Capon

Director, Monash Sustainable Development Institute, Monash University

Tony Capon directs the Monash Sustainable Development Institute (MSDI) and holds a chair in planetary health in the School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine at the University. A former director of the global health institute at United Nations University (UNU-IIGH), he is a public health physician and authority in environmental health and health promotion. His research focuses on urbanisation, sustainable development and population health. Tony has 30 years of leadership and management experience in research, education, policy and practice.
Previously, Tony held professorial appointments with the University of Sydney and Australian National University. He was the founding convenor of the climate change adaptation research network for human health in Australia. The inaugural director of public health and medical officer of health in western Sydney, Tony also worked on the control of non-communicable diseases with the charitable organisation Oxford Health Alliance. Since 2008, Tony has been advising the International Council for Science on the development of a global interdisciplinary science program on health and wellbeing in the changing urban environment using systems approaches.
He has held National Health and Medical Research Council and World Health Organization Fellowships, and has served in numerous honorary leadership roles with professional societies and not-for-profit organisations including the Australasian Faculty of Public Health Medicine in the Royal Australasian College of Physicians, the International Society for Urban Health and the Frank Fenner Foundation (previously called Nature and Society Forum).